Equipping Kids To Deal With Conflict

[vc_row type=”full_width_background” full_screen_row_position=”middle” bg_color=”#ffffff” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” bottom_padding=”10%” overlay_strength=”1″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_row_inner column_margin=”default” text_align=”left”][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”10/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid” delay=”100″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1531188240081{padding-top: 4% !important;padding-right: 4% !important;padding-bottom: 4% !important;padding-left: 4% !important;}”]Conflict is inevitable. We find it in our parliament, in our workplaces, in our homes and relationships. No human is exactly alike in personality, upbringing, background and all the other components which make up a person. It is no wonder then that when we humans interact there will inevitably be differences of opinion and outlook. This fact is not one that should strike fear into our hearts because while conflict and differences can be difficult to manage, using conflict resolution techniques it is possible to manage a disagreement well.

Interestingly throughout the centuries, conflict and disagreement have also spurred innovation, progress and accomplishments. From Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison to Michelangelo and Leonardo Da Vinci, great works and steps have been made when relations weren’t exactly the rosiest. Jests aside, what it comes down to is equipping yourself and your children to manage conflict well, to give them a range of techniques they can draw upon to navigate a disagreement to a point of understanding and hopefully, resolution.

What kind of conflict resolver are you?

Firstly, assess what techniques you tend to adopt when coming into a situation of conflict. Do you try and avoid conflict? Do you like walking away and having a think? Do you like bringing in another party? Do you like facing the situation head on and knuckling through to a conversation or have you found yourself getting hot headed? It’s important to understand what traits you naturally exhibit because likely as not you will be passing that approach to your children. If you are struggling with a quick temper, you may have to work on approaching conflict in a calmer way and lead by example for your children.

What kind of conflict resolver is your child?

Take some time to examine how you child or children act when conflict flairs. Do they immediately seek out an adult to intervene? Do they use their fists or yelling to assert their dominance in the struggle? Is there much name calling, tears and general kerfuffle? Having an understanding of their difficulties in conflict resolution can help where you can focus your efforts.

5 Steps

Calming Down

It can be infuriating to be told to calm down but to be calm in a situation of conflict is a great position to operate from. Explaining to your child that when there is a disagreement they have the opportunity and right to remain calm. Within that explain to them they have the option to ask for some time to think, to walk away and process the issue, to write down how they are feeling and why they are upset with the situation. Very little will be able to be understood from emotionally fragile children. Explain that it is better to talk when they have calmed down and had some time to think.

Explaining and Understanding the Problem

Once your child is calm, explain to them that they can take a deep breathe and truthfully explaining the lead up to the situation. Encourage your child to always lead with “I did this” or “I feel this” rather than the accusatory “you did this” and “you are terrible”. Ask them to think deeply about their role in conflict and to be honest about responsibility and regret. Using the formula of “I feel [x] because [person b] did this and I reacted like [x].

Apologising Well

An apology should contain at least three components, regret, responsibility and remedy. No human likes being wrong but acknowledging a mistake goes miles in repairing and improving relationships with those around us.

Using “I’m sorry” is a great start. Clearly taking responsibility for wrongful doing is the next step, “I did pinch you in the ear and I’m sorry”. Encourage your child to think of a way they can fix the situation, “can I give your ear a kiss, dear sister of mine?” Ask them also to consider how they will behave differently in the future and a great finish is asking for forgiveness.

Encourage Solution Managing

A trap that many parents fall into is jumping into a situation of conflict, what this does is prevents children from troubleshooting their own conflict resolution techniques. Encourage your child or children to seek to solve the situation by themselves. Explaining to them to give each party to the conflict time to speak and explain how they see things can bring about understanding to all. Speaking kindly and honestly, without raised voices is another technique to keep tempers down.

Checking In

Spend some time each week asking your child if they have had any disagreements with friends or people at school. Ask if they felt they were able to handle the situation well. By checking in regularly you can see if there are any elements of conflict resolution that need your attention and go from there. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Healthy Breakfasts Without The Stress

[vc_row type=”full_width_background” full_screen_row_position=”middle” bg_color=”#ffffff” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” bottom_padding=”10%” overlay_strength=”1″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_row_inner column_margin=”default” text_align=”left”][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”10/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid” delay=”100″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1529987866071{padding-top: 4% !important;padding-right: 4% !important;padding-bottom: 4% !important;padding-left: 4% !important;}”]Most of us are all nicely squared up on the necessity to chomp on all our daily veggies and fruit. Many of us wake up reciting the healthy goodies that we have to somehow get down into the bellies of our little ones. “Broccoli” we toss and turn, “carrots, capsicum, baby spinach” and if it’s particularly potent dream, “yes, ok, quinoa, kale, goji berries, they will eat them, I swear, just please, let me live.”

Yet come morning, as we blearily look through our eyes, all that passion, all that hope for the healthiest diet this side of the wholesale organic market, the outlook seems bleak. One kid is yelling that they can’t find their shoes, the other isn’t happy with how their uniform feels, which they have worn for three years and is refusing to put it on. So. Yes, how to have a breakfast that nourishes little bodies and gets everyone to school and work on time? Paediatric nutritionist Mandy Sacher has some tips.

  1. Preparation

There’s no way to avoid it. If we want to avoid headache come the early morn, the best bet is always to have had plan beforehand. Give yourself time to plan meals, particularly breakfast beforehand. In giving yourself that time, you can prep for meals that will be nutritious and delicious and not break the bank or you.

  1. Eggs, So Many Eggs

Eggs are inexpensive, have enough protein to power a bodybuilder and can be gobbled up in record time. With a myriad of ways to serve eggs up, they can afford you the versatility and time saving opportunities we all so desperately need.

Pair scrambled, fried or all chucked in higgledy piggledy, along with some ready made pikelets or buckwheat pancakes and nom, nom, nom, protein, carbohydrate and healthy fat intake on a great start for the day. Throw in the leftover vegetables for an omelette or frittata.

  1. Porridge Power

Throw one part rolled oats to two parts liquid (water, milk, soy milk or almond milk or whatever you prefer really) your favourite fruit, a pinch of seasoning like cinnamon and carob powder into a bowl. Add your fave nuts and seeds and soak it all overnight in the fridge. Come morning, heat and eat for you and your families nutritious pleasure.

  1. Sourdough Toast Makes Happy Tummies

Sourdough is high in protein and minerals than white bread and is far more easily processed by your stomach. Read the ingredients carefully, sourdough bread should only be comprised of wholemeal spelt flour, salt and water. To make the loaf last longer pop it in the freezer and take out only the pieces you need for toast in the morning. Pop an egg on top and it’s all engines are go.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Hopping Off The Guilt Train To See And Appreciate Prenatal Science Clearly

[vc_row type=”full_width_background” full_screen_row_position=”middle” bg_color=”#ffffff” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” bottom_padding=”10%” overlay_strength=”1″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_row_inner column_margin=”default” text_align=”left”][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”10/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid” delay=”100″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1529987520926{padding-top: 4% !important;padding-right: 4% !important;padding-bottom: 4% !important;padding-left: 4% !important;}”]It’s a tricky topic to tackle, how a mum’s mood can affect her unborn baby. Many studies have been published on this topic and sometimes the effect is the opposite of what scientific papers seek to do, which is to inform. What can occur instead, is a fear mongering that causes many, including the people that need it least, i.e. pregnant mums, to increase the fear they have for their unborn children and themselves.

Sadly what many discussions of these papers have lead to is a heaping of guilt upon mothers, by themselves, by their families and by society in general. Sometimes the guilt is unintentionally created but when it comes to a group of people that are sensitive to the wellbeing of children, look no further than mums. So it is with tact, compassion and care that studies of mother-moods to child development need to be discussed.

It is widely known that a woman’s body, mind and any substance intake may have significant effects on the baby she is carrying. Health care experts across the board encourage women to prioritise their health, particularly prenatal care, in the effort to increase the positive outcome for mum and bub in the long run.

A healthy diet, consistent daily exercise while pregnant are all factors that should be seriously considered by woman and mums to be. The positive outcomes to a healthy lifestyle are encouraging incentives for all humans, regardless of gender. Yet when it comes to growing and caring for the life of another tiny human, many mums feel the added pressure to be perfect. Perfection is unattainable for any human being. Mums, it is not possible for us to be perfect what we can only do is try our best. With this freedom to operate without the shackle to be perfect we can start the journey to understanding the dynamics of our influences on our bubs in utero without recriminating ourselves to oblivion.  

From how depression affects foetuses in the womb and outside of it, to the possible effects of antidepressants taken while pregnant, scientific studies do have things to say. While studies are conducted in the effort to figure out more about human development, in the effort to help and protect, it needs to be acknowledged that those who are under the microscope, woman and pregnancy, for us, the topic is not only looking under the skin but can easily get under our skin. Before many women can even access the factual and informative information coming out of these prenatal studies, the culture of responsibility and guilt needs to be addressed. You madam woman, madam pregnant woman are beautiful, valuable and capable. Let us see science as our friend and resource not more ammunition to feel worse about ourselves. This is a discussion that needs to be had countless times over and we’re here for the long run.

To infinity, science, compassion and beyond, oh and a good crunch on some carrots with some hummus, please and thank you. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Bickering Kids And What To Do About It

[vc_row type=”full_width_background” full_screen_row_position=”middle” bg_color=”#ffffff” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” bottom_padding=”10%” overlay_strength=”1″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_row_inner column_margin=”default” text_align=”left”][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”10/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid” delay=”100″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1529985235118{padding-top: 4% !important;padding-right: 4% !important;padding-bottom: 4% !important;padding-left: 4% !important;}”]If they ain’t causing a ruckus towards you and your partner, it’s likely their causing a ruckus between them. Siblings, no matter how close, will at one time or another, have a good solid bicker-fest. From flailing arms to ‘you’re a poo’ ‘no, you’re a poo’ to whatever brand your little ones have come up with, it’s certainly an unpleasant noise addition to any breakfast table, road trip or general Friday night. Scanning the interwebs we’ve searched far and wide for solutions to the age old problem of siblings in a fight.

  1. Hold Hands

It may seem silly but making your kids hold hands is not only a way to direct those flailing arms but it can usually bring about humour. Parents have said that when a fight breaks out they calmly say, ‘Would you like to hold hands now?’ and have reported back that their kids have sorted out the issue quick smart. An iteration of this is the nose to nose approach. Direct your kids to sit on the floor nose to nose and usually within 30 seconds one or both of them will be giggling so hard they’ve forgotten about the fight.

    2. The T-Shirt

Buy a men’s extra large t-shirt and write an endearing term that comes to your mind like ‘this is my I you shirt’ or ‘We love, love, love each other’. Whenever your kids start fighting say it’s time for the ‘I love you shirt’, pop the one shirt over both children, one arm each and see how long it takes them to sort out their differences. Usually not long. Either the hilarity or inconvenience of being in one shirt together will sort them out.

    3. Job Jar

Have a jar with odd chore jobs in it. Any time a fight breaks out direct each child to the jar, grab a magazine and wait for the task to be completed. If even the hint of a fight starts brewing, raise an eyebrow and ask, ‘is it time for the job jar?’, usually things become quiet very quickly.

    4. Money Jar

Have a jar for each of your children and one for yourself. If anyone says something nasty, talks back or hits their sibling, the offending party has to put money into the victims jar. If all children are involved in a squabble them all offending parties have to put money into mum’s jar. At the end of the week, those that have some money can buy a treat with it, including mum.

    5. Give them a challenge to solve together

When a fight is breaking out among your kids, pull out a puzzle and ask them to try and solve it. You can incentivise the task by saying that if they solve the puzzle they can suggest a fun meal for Friday night or something of the like. Cater the challenges to your children’s interests, if they like maths, make it a maths problem, if they’re into stories and drawing, ask all of them to create a universe with creatures and a plotline.

    6. Discuss ‘conflict resolution’ tactics

It’s very important to instil conflict resolution skills in your children. Explain to them that while everyone can have differences, the most important thing is to deal with it well. Let each side have a turn at speaking, listen carefully when it is your turn, ask each other for ideas on how to solve the disagreement and try and always speak calmly. Help them understand yelling, name calling, hitting and shouting over each other are not conflict resolution skills and won’t help them have a fun time playing.

    7. Have the ‘outside bench of discussion’

If a fight breaks out in the house and there is much yelling and disarray, direct all the bickering parties outside. Using this technique, a parent said they have told their kids, ‘I understand you are cranky with one another at the moment but inside this house nobody yells, shouts or hits our their problems, inside this house we talk it out, you can come inside when you have solved this’. They had to say this only twice more and now their children head outside to the bench on their own.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

No More Isolation, Mums Need Support In Community

[vc_row type=”full_width_background” full_screen_row_position=”middle” bg_color=”#ffffff” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” bottom_padding=”10%” overlay_strength=”1″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_row_inner column_margin=”default” text_align=”left”][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”10/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid” delay=”100″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1529980612700{padding-top: 4% !important;padding-right: 4% !important;padding-bottom: 4% !important;padding-left: 4% !important;}”]One of the trends of our modern age is the move away from community living. As income and affluence has developed over the decades, more and more families have started to live in micro units. For many in Western society, cohabiting with only a partner and your children is a very normal way to go about living, yet there are countless cultures across the world where mums, dads, grandparents, aunts and uncles either live together or live extremely close. This can seem a daunting prospect with lots of noise and kerfuffle to boot but there is a positive flip side to this mode of living, community.

Loneliness Is A Problem

Psychologists, academics and experts across the health sciences are all greatly unanimous when it comes to speaking into one of today’s greatest epidemics, loneliness. Loneliness and isolation affects millions of people across the world with grievous consequences, especially mothers. From being a new mum with this strange, beautiful and constantly crying bub to look after to attempting to manage tryanical tantrums from a trying toddler, being a mum is a colossal job that takes inexplicable amounts of emotional, physical, spiritual and sometimes existential energy. Like any machine, once fuel has been used, there has to be a way to refill. Nothing runs on empty.

Mums Need Support

Mums need support. Mums, you deserve support. It’s time society at large woke up to this and responded. But mums, we have a role to play as well, no more the ‘game face’ while everything inside is quaking, we need to reach out, we need to seek out trusted sources of comfort and we need to allow ourselves to be vulnerable.

It’s Ok To Say You’re Not Okay

Putting on a brave face and muddling through has been the mantra of mums for generations gone by but it is not always a helpful one. Transitioning and coping in motherhood is a tumultuous time, so many elements of your life are changing, no one should be expected to cope doing life without a network of support how much more a woman who now has the responsibility for caring for a human life.

Create Your Village

Before, while you are pregnant and after giving birth, seek out a network. A great start is to take the time to dwell on the people in your life who are kind, wise and thoughtful. Don’t be afraid to directly speak to them about what you are doing. Through being clear that you want them to be a part of their network they will be able to understand and prepare for things that they’d like to do to support you.

  1. Ask friends to regularly call you after you’ve had your baby. Your mind might be in a tizzy but they will be able to lead the communication.
  2. Schedule regular, weekly catch ups at your local cafe or park. This is a great way to make sure you get out of the house, get your dose of daily fresh air and have a grown up conversation with another adult. Also, treat yourself to your favourite dish. You’re sustaining another life for goodness sake, you go girl.
  3. Be a part of online communities. Seek out communities that are all about supporting, equipping and just loving on mothers (KidNest is looking right atcha, gurl). This way, when you’re home alone with a crying bub you can reach out and KNOW you are not alone. You are a part of a sisterhood that is going to get through this together.
  4. You don’t even have to source your network from people you directly know. Google local mums’ groups in your area and rock up. It is very likely you will find like minded mums who are in the same position you are. You’ll be able to make new friends and get socialised up!
  5. Seek out a trusted doctor, pharmacist or counsellor that you can rely on for solid medical advice as well as a good chat.
  6. Schedule in weekly activities with friends that will use your brain. From chess to painting, sudoku sessions in the park and everything in between, grab a friend and head somewhere fun, bub in tow, to get those neurons firing.

And remember, go easy on yourself. Being a mum is a 24/7 job that asks a lot. Be gentle on yourself when it comes to coping, adjusting and living. And be sure to lean into your network. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

How To Sneak In Veggies

[vc_row type=”full_width_background” full_screen_row_position=”middle” bg_color=”#ffffff” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” bottom_padding=”10%” overlay_strength=”1″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_row_inner column_margin=”default” text_align=”left”][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner enable_animation=”true” animation=”fade-in-from-bottom” column_padding=”padding-3-percent” column_padding_position=”top-bottom” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”10/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid” delay=”100″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1529979905866{padding-top: 4% !important;padding-right: 4% !important;padding-bottom: 4% !important;padding-left: 4% !important;}”]Beneath every calm mum facade there is actually a cunning and ruthless special agent. This life wasn’t chosen by us, it came out of necessity, it was borne out of adversity, it came out of a response. A response to an even greater operate of cunning and stealth, a child’s appetite and palate. Try sneaking in a bunch of broccoli while they are playing on the ipad, not on your nelly, a head whips up and from the mouth of babes comes, “nahh mum, broccoli is gross, can I just have cheese tonight?” Yes, just cheese, beautiful, indulgent, we can’t eat too much of, cheese. What’s a special agent to do? Get focussed, get brave and make like a Musk and innovate.

  1. Dunk and Dip

Sometimes the first step is the smallest but at least a step has been taken! Cut up carrots, capsicum, cucumber and any other vegetables that you want to introduce to your children. Partner these chopped vegetables with healthy dips like hummus, salsa or any low fat salad dressing, yogurt-based ones are best if you need that extra creamy edge. Having the veggies in chopped form allows for easy access, high tactility and dipping fun! Kids are naturally drawn to activities where they can lead with touch and explore. Through exposing your children to veggies with some yummy dips, the incentive is greater to eat up all the nutrients in those chopped delights. Chopped veggies are great for school lunches and after school snacks.

    2. Get Kids Cooking

Research some healthy recipes that you would like to try. Save a few to a folder on your computer. This way you can start accruing a few recipes that you can rely on in later weeks. Bring your children around the computer or even ask them to write out the recipe in their neatest handwriting to a menu book. Through involving your kids in the process of researching recipes and meals, excitement and anticipation can build for the process of cooking and eating. A tip is to make sure you highlight the pictures on the menus to tantalise their taste buds. Ask them to be in charge of retrieving certain ingredients from the supermarket and assign each child a chopping and preparation roll. Through being involved children and humans in general form a bond with the activity and final outcome. A great help when it comes to fuss free healthy eating!

    3. Allow Treats

Going too far in the effort to instil healthy habits in your family can have a backlash. By making anything remotely unhealthy completely off limits, many junk foods can start to have an almost god-like glow. Shaping the conversation around ‘always’ and ‘sometimes’ food can be a great start to children having a good relationship with food. ‘Sometimes’ food like sugary cereal, fizzy drinks and lollies can be for rewards, weekends of special events. McDonalds can be a sometimes, eating high-fibre cereal in the mornings an always. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/12″ column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]